Tag Archive | "debt"

I Need A Debt Management Expert!

I Need A Debt Management Expert!

751221191 fdb8eae75c m I Need A Debt Management Expert!
Image by TW Collins via Flickr

In today’s world there are no shortage of people with debt management issues. So where do you go for debt management help? Here are a few quick tips from the debt management expert…

1) Go to Debt Management Expert web sites: This site is organized to give you helpful advice on a variety of debt management issues. We are specifically looking at large issues involving your home and credit. We also recommend that you look to other debt management sites to get helpful tips. There is no substitute for reading up on the issues that you face and looking at how different experts recommend you approach those issues.

2) Talk to people who may be in similar debt management situations: They may not be debt management experts but they certainly will give you another perspective. It may be uncomfortable but it is highly likely that someone in your situation has tried something to help their situation that may actually help your situation. If you don’t know anyone directly join a debt forum and learn in a more anonymous fashion.

3) Explore debt management and debt settlement companies as potential debt management experts: These companies can help but there a both pros and cons to working with them. Make sure you really understand what you get out of this before taking the dive. Many are debt management experts but they are also trying to make a buck. For more information on this read our recent post: Enrolling in a Debt Management Plan to Help Your Monthly Budget and How Debt Management and Debt Settlement Companies Can Simplify Your Financial Life.
4) Attorneys as debt management experts: Talk to a bankruptcy attorney or a loan modification attorney. Attorney’s can be a good solution if you need to modify your loan or if you are considering bankruptcy, but again this comes down to your specific situation. Don’t limit you conversation to one attorney. Talk to several if you go this route and then toughly reference them to make sure that they are debt management experts with good track records.

If you spend the time to do all these well, the next time you look in the mirror you may see a Debt Management Expert.

Related Articles:

 I Need A Debt Management Expert!

Posted in Credit ScoreComments (0)

Enrolling in a Debt Management Plan to Help Your Monthly Budget

Enrolling in a Debt Management Plan to Help Your Monthly Budget

Enrolling in a debt management plan
Signing up for a debt management plan may give you more breathing room in your monthly budget, but will it hurt your credit? Not as much as you may think. Using a debt management plan to pay off debt won’t hurt your credit score, but it may make it difficult to qualify for new credit.

Debt management plan: Protecting your credit score
When you enroll in a debt management program, you write a monthly check to a credit-counseling agency and the agency pays your creditors. A debt management plan usually lasts three or four years. A notation stating that you are paying an account through a credit-counseling agency appears on your credit report and remains until the account is paid in full. Paying an account through a credit counseling agency will not hurt your credit score.

Debt management plan: Qualifying for new credit
Participating in a debt management plan could make it difficult for you to qualify for additional credit, and some debt management plans prohibit consumers from applying for new credit anyway.

Some creditors may see that a person is in a debt management plan and decide that they have all the debt they can handle. Other creditors might view participation in a debt management plan as a positive step, a sign that a consumer has taken responsibility for and is serious about paying off debt.

The more a creditor bases a lending decision on a consumer’s credit score, the less a consumer’s participation in a debt-management plan is likely to matter. A typical creditor uses the FICO score. They don’t look at notations on the account. Paying off a big chunk of debt on your own or with the help of a debt management plan will give your credit score a boost.

Debt management plan: Late payments hurt your credit score
What will hurt your credit score? Not debt management plans. Instead, being 30 or 60 days late with any payments can adversely impact your credit rating. Those negative marks hurt your credit score and can mar your credit report for up to seven years.

Debt management plan: Choose wisely
It is very important to choose a debt management plan carefully. If the agency administering the program misses or is late with a payment, it is your credit record that gets impacted. Enrollment and monthly fees for debt management plans vary widely. Some companies may charge several hundred dollars for their services, while others charge monthly fees of $20 or less.

With a debt management plan, a consumer usually gets reduced interest rates, lower monthly payments, no more late fees and fewer calls and letters from creditors. Debt-counseling agencies get their operating money by receiving a percentage of each client’s payments back from creditors.

If you are current on your bills, you may want to try negotiating new payment amounts and lower interest rates with creditors on your own. You never know what kind of deal you may land. And you may be able to make real headway on your debt by simply tightening your belt for a few months and freeing up more cash for debt payments.

Debt management plan: Monitor your debt counselor
If your situation is more serious or you just feel plain overwhelmed, you may want to talk to a debt counselor. If you decide to sign on for a debt management plan, be sure to monitor your credit bills carefully. Is the agency paying your bills on time as promised? You need to be vigilant and look at your statements regularly.

If you discover a problem with bills paid through a debt consolidation company or credit counselor, report the company to a local consumer protection agency or state attorney general‘s office. You can also file a complaint with the Better Business Bureau. For more ideas on how to monitor these companies, see some of the suggestions by the FTC on Debt Management Plans.

Examples of Debt Management Companies

 Enrolling in a Debt Management Plan to Help Your Monthly Budget

Posted in Debt Consolidation, Debt Management, Your BudgetComments (0)

What if I Find a Mistake on My Credit Report?

What if I Find a Mistake on My Credit Report?

OVERVIEW
Mistakes found on your credit report can be avoided by and/or corrected by following some straightforward procedures.

A big part of being fiscally responsible these days is checking on your credit report. Individuals can get a free credit report from each of the major credit reporting bureaus — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — every 12 months. Checking your credit report is as simple as having these bureaus send you a copy of your credit report and looking it over. Most of the time, these credit reports are correct. But what do you do if you find a mistake?

Credit Report: Check Each Credit Card Account
When you check over your credit report, you need to check each credit card account. The information on the open accounts should match the information you have in your records at home. Check each credit card, including card numbers, balances, and payment histories. If a discrepancy is found, you should contact your credit card company and check your information against theirs. If it is the credit card company’s error, they will correct it and notify the credit bureaus during their next reporting cycle. If it is not their error, you will need to check with the reporting credit bureau to see if the error originated with them. If so, you’ll need to send the credit bureau a copy of your most recent credit card statement, so that the credit bureau can correct their mistake.

Credit Report: Check Your Credit Card Payment History
It’s also important to check payment histories. Payment history can help or harm your credit score (your FICO score) and it is important to be sure that these are correct. If you find a discrepancy, find the documentation necessary to prove yourself and send that to your credit card company. These errors may take a little time to fix, but this is something you can do yourself.

Credit Report: Check All Closed Accounts
Check all closed accounts that are listed by the credit bureau on your credit report. Be sure that the credit report shows no balances on those accounts and that all the accounts are closed. If you believe a credit card account is closed, you will need to get proof of this from the credit card company and send that on to the credit bureau in order for them to correct this mistake.

Credit Report: Contact Credit Card Company if You Find a Credit Report Error
If you find an open account on your credit report that is not yours, contact the credit card company and the credit card bureaus immediately. This can sometimes happen when someone with the same name opens a credit card account and it is accidentally attached to your credit report. Once information such as social security numbers and personal information are verified, these mistakes are usually quickly fixed by the credit card company or credit bureau.

Credit Report: Keep Copies of Correspondence With Credit Bureaus
When dealing with credit bureaus while trying to fix a credit report, it’s a good idea to keep copies of all correspondences you’ve had with the credit bureaus and the credit card companies. These can be useful if the dispute with the credit bureaus or credit card companies is not easily solved.

Credit Report and Fraudulent Activity
If you find evidence of fraudulent activity or identity theft on your credit report, it’s best to contact an attorney or law enforcement official immediately, as well as to let the reporting credit bureaus know. Fraud is not something you can settle yourself and will need to be professionally handled.

Posted in All About Your Credit, Credit Score, Tips and Tools for Improving Your CreditComments (0)

Tips to Get Yourself Out of Credit Card Debt

Tips to Get Yourself Out of Credit Card Debt

200px Smartcard2 Tips to Get Yourself Out of Credit Card Debt
Image via Wikipedia

OVERVIEW
Do you have too much credit card debt? It will take commitment and discipline, but here are some tips to get yourself out of credit card debt.

Do you have too much credit card debt? Many people are embarrassed or ashamed of how much credit card debt they have or how they got to that point in their lives. If you have too much credit card debt, admitting that is the first step toward getting yourself out. It will take commitment and discipline, but here are some tips to get yourself out of credit card debt:

• Too Much Credit Card Debt? Stop Using Your Credit Card
Stopping your credit card usage can be the toughest step of all, but it’s the most important. If you are aware you have too much credit card debt, you need to stop using the cards. Not incurring more credit card debt is the best way to digging yourself out of further problems.

• Too Much Credit Card Debt? Find Small Ways to Save
Take a good, hard look at where your money goes every day. The latte you grab on the way into work and the $10.00 sandwich are expenses that add up if you incur them every day. Take a look at your cell phone plan, your cable bill, and any other subscription services you have that could be trimmed or entirely cut out. Seemingly small savings of $50-100 can make a big difference when paying down your credit card debt.

• Too Much Credit Card Debt? Check on Interest Rates
Contact your lenders and ask about lowering the interest rate they’re charging on your credit card debt. The credit market is very competitive and many companies are willing to work with you and not lose your business. Once you’ve gotten your interest rates lowered, prioritize your payments, paying off higher interest rate credit card debt first.

• Too Much Credit Card Debt? Contact Your Creditors
If you find yourself in the position of having to miss a payment, contact your creditor and let them know about this. Try to set up a payment plan that you are sure you can meet. You don’t want to come back to them at a later date and try to renegotiate.

• Too Much Credit Card Debt? Home Equity Loans
It’s possible to tap into your home equity for a secured loan to pay off your credit card debt. You can secure a lower interest rate, fixed monthly payments, and peace of mind. Be sure to only do this if you have kicked the credit card spending habit. Many people will pay off credit card debt with home equity, only to run up their bills again.

• Too Much Credit Card Debt? Debt Consolidation
Unsecured debt consolidation is a possible solution to your credit card debt problem. Finding a non-profit debt settlement company can help you get your credit card debt consolidated into one monthly payment that you can afford.

Credit card debt has become immensely popular these days, with every nearly every other person finding themselves in debt problems. The trick is, in knowing how to deal with your credit card debt situation and taking steps to rectify your problems.

 Tips to Get Yourself Out of Credit Card Debt

Posted in Credit Score, Debt ConsolidationComments (0)

Are You In Trouble With Debt?

Are You In Trouble With Debt?

OVERVIEW
People often don’t recognize that they are in trouble with debt until it is too late. Ask yourself these questions to see whether or not you are in trouble with debt.

People often don’t recognize that they are in trouble with debt until it is too late. Ask yourself these questions to see whether or not you are in trouble with debt.

1. In trouble with debt: Do you have a clear picture of your credit card debt?
Many people feel they have a credit card debt problem, but they refuse to acknowledge it. They avoid looking at their credit card balances. They still use their credit cards, even though they know they shouldn’t. They pay off one credit card with a check from another. They transfer credit card debt balances instead of making payments. These are all signs that your credit card debt could be getting out of control.
2. In trouble with debt: Do you pay only the minimum credit card payment every month?
Paying only the monthly minimum can get you into credit card debt trouble quickly. Paying the monthly minimum will cover the interest and fees associated with your credit card, but it will not begin to decrease the credit card debt you owe.
3. In trouble with debt: Do you make late payments? Have you missed payments entirely?
Making a late payment usually means you’re waiting for the money to come in. This means you’re behind already and you will have trouble catching up. Missing payments entirely just means you’re getting further behind on your credit card debt.
4. In trouble with debt: Are you using credit cards to buy things because you don’t have the money to pay for them at that time? You can get into trouble with debt quickly with credit cards if you’re using them to buy things you cannot afford. If you can’t afford an item this month, it’s likely you’ll not be able to afford it the next month either. If you continue to buy things you cannot afford, you will get into more credit card debt trouble.
5. In trouble with debt: Does your paycheck only your bills? If your paycheck is already spent before you get it, chances are you have trouble with debt.
6. In trouble with debt: Do you choose the longest terms for a new debt? If you buy a new car, do you choose to pay over 60 months or 36? If you consistently choose the longest loan period for a major purchase so that you can afford the payments along with all your other payments, you have a problem with the amount of debt you’re carrying.
7. In trouble with debt: Have you already gone through a home equity loan to pay down your debt? If you have and you’re still running up more debt, you have debt trouble.
8. In trouble with debt: How much monthly debt do you have every month when compared to your income? If your unsecured debt (not including mortgage or rent) is more than 20% of your paycheck, you are in trouble with debt.
9. In trouble with debt: Do you have savings for a rainy day? If you don’t have a fund for an emergency and you have debts, you are in trouble with debt.
10. In trouble with debt: Do you worry about money? If you spend more time worrying about your debts than you do paying them, chances are you are in trouble with debt.

 Are You In Trouble With Debt?

Posted in Bankruptcy, Debt ConsolidationComments (0)

How Debt Management and Debt Settlement Companies Can Simplify Your Financial Life?

How Debt Management and Debt Settlement Companies Can Simplify Your Financial Life?

200px Smartcard2 How Debt Management and Debt Settlement Companies Can Simplify Your Financial Life?
Image via Wikipedia

OVERVIEW
Debt management or debt settlement companies can often save you time and trouble when it comes to debt consolidation. A benefit of using a debt management company is the ease of the transition from having many, smaller debts to having one larger one. That being said you need to closely review any company you plan to work with to ensure that they are doing what you agree to.

—————–

The process of debt consolidation can be tricky and intimidating and often not something for you to try, if you are not financially savvy. Debt management or debt settlement companies can often save you time and trouble when it comes to debt consolidation. A benefit of using a debt management company is the ease of the transition from having many, smaller debts to having one larger one. A debt settlement company will take over paying all your creditors. You have to make one simple payment every month.

The idea of debt consolidation is simple. The many smaller debts you carry are covered by one large loan. These are typically unsecured loans such as credit cards, personal loans, store credit cards, and bank overdrafts. The benefits of debt consolidation are that that you can negotiate one interest rate for this loan and you can negotiate the amount of the payment. Often, during the negotiation process, you can often reduce the amount of the debt.

Pros of Debt Settlement
• Avoid bankruptcy – By using a debt management company to consolidate your debt, you will can reduce your debt burden and pay off your bills more comfortably. You can protect assets, such as your car and your home, using debt settlement.
• Make One Easy Payment – You will make one payment to consolidate your debt each month to the debt management company. They will disperse the funds to the creditors. This one payment on your consolidated debt simplifies your bill paying enormously.
• Avoid Harassment – Debt collectors are notorious for their ruthless tactics. A debt management company eliminates a debt collector’s ability to hound you for payment on your consolidated debt.
• Avoid Lawsuit – Debt settlement companies can help you get a hold of your consolidated debts and get them settled in reasonable manner. This can help eliminate the possibility of a lawsuit against you.

Cons
• Debt consolidation negatively affects your credit score.
• During debt settlement, some of your accounts will get charged off. Debt consolidation can negatively impact your credit score. Debt consolidation can be repaired through time and careful use of credit in the future.
• Fees
• Some unscrupulous debt management companies will charge exorbitant fees for their services. Often, you will be asked to pay a percentage of your monthly payment to the debt settlement company in fees.

Points to remember:
• Choose a reputable non-profit debt management agency for debt consolidation. Make sure you toughly investigate the company you decide to use. You need to make sure you choose your debt management company wisely.
• Learn the fee structure for debt consolidation up front.
• Before you agree to a debt management plan, understand the impact this will have on your credit rating.
• Stop using your credit while you’re trying to repair your debt. Create a budget and stick to it.

Related Articles:

Examples of Debt Management Companies:

 How Debt Management and Debt Settlement Companies Can Simplify Your Financial Life?

Posted in Debt Consolidation, Debt ManagementComments (2)

Credit Bureaus: Who Are They and What Do They Do?

Credit Bureaus: Who Are They and What Do They Do?

OVERVIEW
A credit bureau collects information from different sources about credit and payment information and then provides that information in an organized fashion to lenders. The three primary credit bureaus in the United States are Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion. Credit bureaus create credit reports for lenders that are basically a history of your borrowing and repayment habits. Companies who are trying to determine the creditworthiness of an individual typically request credit reports.

———————-

Who is a Credit Bureau?
A credit bureau collects information from different sources about credit and payment information and then provides that information in an organized fashion to lenders. The three primary credit bureaus in the United States are Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion.

What Information Do Credit Bureaus Collect?
Credit bureaus create credit reports for lenders that are basically a history of your borrowing and repayment habits. On these credit reports, you’ll find your personal information, information about your credit accounts, including your mortgage and your credit cards, any public information about negative events in your history, such as bankruptcies and tax liens, and inquiries that have been made about your credit history, by yourself and others.

Credit bureaus such as Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion take in credit information from companies called data furnishers. These data furnishers are usually lenders and creditors, utilities, debt collection agencies and the courts. Data furnishers report their data to the credit bureaus voluntarily. They might not report all data to all three bureaus, and some lending or credit companies might not report your data at all.

The information collected by the credit bureaus gets collected and stored in their files and databases. This information is then accessed when a credit report or credit assessment is created for an individual. Companies who are trying to determine the creditworthiness of an individual typically request credit reports.

How Do Credit Bureaus Create Credit Scores?
Credit bureaus collect information from data furnishers and they then create a credit score for their customers based on the information they have collected. The credit bureaus create these scores using a mathematical formula that calculates the likelihood that you’ll repay a loan based on comparing your information to others in a similar situation. This credit score helps lenders evaluate the risk associated with lending you money and helps them to assess interest rate on the money they may be willing to lend.

The three credit bureaus, Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion, do not all use the same scoring system and they do not have exactly the same data from the data furnishers. All three credit reports may contain different information. These bureaus are for-profit businesses and are not affiliated with the government, although they are subject to government rules and regulations. These credit bureaus, also known as consumer reporting agencies (CRA’s), are required to provide to consumers a free copy of each of their credit reports every 12 months.

 Credit Bureaus: Who Are They and What Do They Do?

Posted in All About Your Credit, Credit ScoreComments (0)

How and Why to Get Your Free Credit Report Every Year

How and Why to Get Your Free Credit Report Every Year

200px Smartcard2 How and Why to Get Your Free Credit Report Every Year
Image via Wikipedia

Overview
Learn how to get a free credit report from each of the three credit bureaus every year and why it is important that you review your credit report on an annual basis.

————-

Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, you are entitled to a free credit report from each of the credit bureaus (TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian) every 12 months.

As a responsible consumer, it’s important to review your credit report on a yearly basis. When you review your credit report, look for any derogatory information listed. Checking the information on your credit report on a regular basis can help in two ways. First, it can alert you to any fraudulent activity that has been taking place with your name or your accounts. Second, it can alert you to any mistakes that might have been made that need to be corrected. There are ways to work with the credit bureaus to correct any mistakes that might turn up on your credit report.

Agencies specializing in credit reports keep information about the borrowing and repayment habits of millions of Americans. The credit bureaus provide this information in a credit report to lenders who are trying to evaluate customer’s strengths and weaknesses. These credit bureaus, such as Experian and Equifax, provide information about the type of credit you use, and how long you’ve had each account. The credit bureaus will also provide information about your payment history.

When a lender looks at your credit report from a credit bureau such as Experian or Equifax, the lender will look at your credit score. Each credit bureau creates a unique credit score. Those credit scores are determined by looking at the information on your credit report, such as your payment history, the amount of credit you have available, and the amount of debt you currently have. A lender will look at your credit report to determine whether or not you are an acceptable credit risk.

To obtain the credit reports each year, you need to do the following:

1. Visit www.annualcreditreport.com. This is the official site to help consumers obtain their credit reports from each of the three credit bureaus, Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion.
2. Or call 1-877-322-8228. You can request your free credit report over the phone.
3. Or fill out the Annual Credit Report Request Form, which can be found at https://www.annualcreditreport.com/cra/requestformfinal.pdf, and mail the credit report to the address listed on the form.

You are entitled to a free credit report from each of the three bureaus each year. There are no hidden costs. If you are asked to pay for a credit report or join a subscription service, you are dealing with a fraudulent provider. There is no need to provide personal information to legitimately obtain any of these free credit reports.
You can obtain all three credit reports at the same time when you request them using the methods listed above. You can also request one credit report from each credit bureau at a time. A good way to monitor your credit report every few months is to request a credit report from Equifax and then request a credit report from Experian a few months later, followed in another few months by a credit report from TransUnion. This way, you can be assured that your credit information is correct and secure.

 How and Why to Get Your Free Credit Report Every Year

Posted in All About Your Credit, Credit ScoreComments (1)

Debt Consolidation: How To and Pros and Cons

Debt Consolidation: How To and Pros and Cons

202px smartcard2 Debt Consolidation: How To and Pros and Cons

Overview
Are you unsure of how to consolidate your debt and whether debt consolidation is the right approach for you? When you consolidate your debt, you take out a loan to pay off several other debts. This allows you to consolidate the money you owe into one payment and manage your debt more effectively.

Although credit is much harder to come by during these challenging economic times, there are still a number of ways that you can potentially consolidate your debt, such as:

• Credit cards debt consolidation: If you can pay off the balance during the introductory rate period, consolidating your credit cards makes a lot of sense. Make sure to read the fine print carefully before you take any action. Sometimes there are fees associated with the transfer. Also make sure you know when those promotional interest rates end.

• Home equity loans: If you are a homeowner with some equity established in the property, a home equity loan may be the perfect solution for you to consolidate your debt. While they are not as easy to obtain as before, the terms of a home equity loan are very favorable from lenders, with payments that are usually tax deductible. The terms of the line are variable or fixed and can often extend for 30 years. The only clear downside to consolidating your debt in this manner is that your collateral against the loan is the property you own.

• Retirement funds: Considered to be an option of last resort, the interest is rarely tax-deductible, though you are paying interest to yourself instead of the bank. If you are unable to pay it back to the fund within a specified period, you may incur taxes and penalties from the IRS.

• Whole life insurance: If you have a whole life policy that pays an annuity premium to you, you can borrow against its value. You have the option of paying or not paying it back, however if you do not repay the loan, it will be deducted from the total value, thereby of the premium, thereby lessening what those who inherit the value of your policy will receive.

• Credit union: Credit unions generally have lower fees and lower interest rates on loans. It is worthwhile to find out if you can join one.

• Nonprofit consumer credit counseling agency: “What they often will do is, rather than consolidating debt, you pay them a fixed amount and they pay it out to your creditors. It’s a kind of discipline that can be helpful. It’s enforcing a change in spending habits. For the person who is serious about getting out of debt, that’s a solution.”

• Primary lender: In the same way that you might approach your primary lender about a loan modification, you might also consider using the same tactics in this case to renegotiate the terms of your loan so that it is more favorable to you.

Should You Consolidate Debt?
Whether or not you choose to consolidate your debt is a personal decision that specifically depends on your financial situation. Debt consolidation offers many pros and cons:

Pros of Debt Consolidation
Debt consolidation should potentially save you money through lower interest payments and the likelihood of fewer late fees due to the reduction in the number of payments to distinct lenders. Debt consolidation should also help you to rebuild your credit score if you can keep up with the monthly payments due under the revised terms. Debt consolidation should also make it easier for you to organize your finances.

A debt consolidation loan could be helpful if you ran up your credit cards while you were in business school, or if you have a number of high interest student or car installment loans. This will allow you to roll this high interest debt into one manageable payment.

Cons of Debt Consolidation
Debt consolidation is not the right answer in every case. Debt consolidation does not provide a remedy for credit problems. You may have a difficult time finding a fair and reasonable interest rate. If the rate on your new loan is not any better than the rate you pay on your current loans, consolidating your debt would not make much sense.

It can also take longer to pay debts off. When you consolidate debt, you still end up owing the same amount of money. The main difference is usually the length of the term. This could leave you paying more in interest if the term is really long. The best way to combat additional interest payments is to pay down the principal on top of your monthly payments, but doing this may be beyond your means.

You should contact a financial advisor or accountant to evaluate the pros and cons of debt consolidation and whether the option is right for you.

 Debt Consolidation: How To and Pros and Cons

Posted in All About Your Credit, Debt Consolidation, Tips and Tools for Improving Your CreditComments (0)

The Obama Plan: What the Bailout Means to People Who Need Debt Relief

The Obama Plan: What the Bailout Means to People Who Need Debt Relief

debt bailout and your mortgage The Obama Plan: What the Bailout Means to People Who Need Debt ReliefMillions of Americans are feeling the stings and arrows of the declining economy. In 2008, over 250,000 homes were foreclosed each month – which translates into three million homes foreclosed in the entire year. More credit card debt is racked up each month, and millions of Americans are looking to consumer credit counseling services for debt management help. Now that newly elected President Obama has signed his stimulus bill into law, what does that mean for the average American with debt management issues?

Who the Plan Will Not Help

First and foremost, Americans must realize that the stimulus plan is not “free money.” People who have uncontrollable debt management issues will not suddenly see their debt wiped away. With that said, the plan does provide debt help to those in serious trouble with their mortgages and credit card debt.

Remember that the bill is a financial plan to help stimulate the American economy, not pay off personal debt. However, by helping Americans manage and control debt, more expendable income can be spent on goods and services – which is exactly how the plan hopes to revive the economy.

How the Plan Can Relieve Mortgage Debt

Millions of American homeowners are feeling the financial crunch of extreme adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) interest hikes or job loss, and they find themselves unable to make their regular mortgage payment. With an average of 250,000 homes foreclosed per month, what are homeowners to do?

The mortgage bailout portion of the stimulus package tags $75 billion for the setup and aid of getting mortgage borrowers back on their feet to avoid foreclosure. Though the federal funds will not give you free money to pay off your back payments or reduce your principal balance, the money will be used to set up a government intermediary program that puts qualified borrowers and lenders together to discuss real solutions to mortgage problems.

A homeowner who is suffering a financial crisis and is having trouble meeting mortgage obligations can use the program to help set up and negotiate a loan modification. However, if you are not delinquent on your mortgage and have the financial ability to pay your mortgage, this plan will not help you. In addition, should you have an inability to provide evidence of future employment, mortgage companies are unlikely to help you through this plan either.

A loan modification is a change in the original mortgage terms, such as a lower interest rate or extension of payments that reduces the monthly payment amount. Working with the lender in this fashion could result in the forgiveness of much of the principal balance, limited forbearance, and ultimately, help homeowners keep their homes and avoid the expense and trouble of foreclosure.

The Benefit of Tax Rebates

President Obama has also passed tax rebates for most Americans. Taxpayers will receive a portion of their 2008 paid taxes back to them in cash. Some of that money may be needed to pay back taxes owed or can be spent directly on reducing piling credit card debt.

Americans who are careless about their debt management and spend more than their means will not see much help. It is people who are responsible and are making real efforts to pay off debt who will benefit from the stimulus bill.

 The Obama Plan: What the Bailout Means to People Who Need Debt Relief

Posted in All About Loan Modification, Loan Modification in the NewsComments (0)